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Grey Ghost

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Apr 18 12 9:16 PM

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Clinton bid and won it's share of goverment contracts for two and four cycle models powering various types of military applications. Every vendor and component part had to be certified by the goverment. During the life of the contract material substitutions or vendor changes were not permitted without goverment approval. Any proposed changes to the engine were not approved until a recertification test of approximately 120 hours was successfully completed and signed off by the appropriate goverment inspection team.
A naval request came to Clinton sales in early 1960s seeking a bid to produce a two cycle twin cylinder engine. In application the engine would be attached to a special generator to be used as a power source to operate equipment energizing and aligning the navigational system on the North American A3J Vigilante all weather jet being prepped on the carrier flight deck prior to takeoff.
Final established design specs were: Bore 2.1875, Stroke 1.6875, Cubic Inches 12.68, H.P. 8.6 @ 6,000 r.p.m. with loop scavenging. Other features were the Woodward governor, special carb, recoil starter, radio ignition shielding system, fiber glass blower housing, magnesium one piece cylinder casting with chromed bores and a total engine weight of 23 lbs.
Clinton was awarded the contract which ran for approx. two years. Component parts were so different thus requiring a special assembly line and engine test. Naval Engineering assessment of the engine stated it had proven to be very dependable, flawless in performance without mechanical problems.
At the end of the contract Clinton toyed with the concept of adding the unit into it's lineup. Marketing did a cost review which indicated low sales volumes and unit cost would be too expensive for Lawn and Garden applications.
In 48 years I have only seen one of these engines which is on display at the Clinton Engines Museum in Iowa.
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Charliesd250

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Posts: 457

#1 [url]

Apr 19 12 7:39 PM

WOW!!! I HAVE TO SEE THIS!!!!

Seems like you have a ton of great storie!!!

Email me if you want parts or engines at [email protected]

60+ engines.
Thousands of parts.

Wheelhorse- RJ-35, RJ-58, 550, 401, 1054, D-250
Choremasters, Midland Walkbehind, Mellinger paddle-wheel

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Grey Ghost

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Apr 19 12 10:46 PM

Some interesting side notes. The govenor was set to run at 4,000 r.p.m., right in the middlle of it's torque curve. Govenor droop to overrun and back spec was set at 160 r.p.m. In generator loading, the load come on almost immediately and leaves the same way. Thats why the Woodward govenor was chosen to meet the spec.

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Larry Rarus

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Posts: 315

#3 [url]

Apr 20 12 6:16 AM

The overall layout is interesting as well. There is no flywheel/fan where one would normally find it. It appears (from the photo at least) to be on the power-take-off side. If so, wouldn't that interfere with mounting the generator assembly?

On another note, I have some documentation which denotes an exchange between Clinton and the U.S. Air Force for an engine to power either a generator or pump. I don't recall. The spec from the USAF stipulated a minimum of 10HP. I believe this is why the 2790 was born. The 2500 was rated at 9.6HP. Clinton made enough minor changes to bump the HP to 10.3 in order to meet the spec. I should try to find that document some day.

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Grey Ghost

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Apr 20 12 10:12 AM

The flywheel was located on the PTO side of the engine. The air flow was in on that side and exited out on the right side of the blower housing right above the recoil starter. As to the lash up of the generator and engine I was told Uncle Sam wanted a quick disconnect of the two componenet assemblies in case one of the units failed. I never saw the faceplate jackshaft coupling but know one end was attached to the engine flywheel. Not sure about the gen. end.
After assembly the engine was placed on the test stand adjusted and run in prior to shipment to a designated goverment address. I have no idea who assembled the two units prior to being shipped to their final destination. I believe the engine in Iowa is one of the first test prototypes.

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#6 [url]

Jul 22 15 11:22 PM

I have one of those motors too...needs carb parts...or a new home? its complete & clean

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